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Sep 17 10 8:01 PM

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From Three Approaches To Psychotherapy. A film series produced by Psychological Films.
Part 1: Dr. Carl Rogers, founder of Client-centered therapy.

The whole of the Rogers section of the film follows on from the introduction and can be viewed HERE. Rogers' section starts at about 3:00 of the 46:30 approx. video.

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#1 [url]

Aug 9 11 10:29 AM

Re: Carl Rogers & Gloria - Three Approaches To Psychotherapy

As posted to the PCINTL listserve, 8 August 2011:

[quote]
Here is a statement I made before Pamela's (Gloria's daughter, Pammy mentioned in the film) presentation at 2011 ADPCA:

WHAT DID GLORIA TEACH US? WHEN LESS IS MORE AND POWER IS WITHIN

Gloria was thrust into life in a patriarchal Catholic family during the era of the great depression. She heard the cacophonous sounds of WWII played in her young years and experienced the anguish of her Polish ancestors receiving the brunt of brutality in the beginning of that war. I imagine that she might have, in the glorious dreams of female adolescents in the 1950’s, fantasized herself as a princess to be swept up by a white knight removing her from her mundane struggles to live “Happily ever After.”

She was always on the edge and between, not only of the great depression but WWII, Korea, Vietnam and the Peace and Civil Rights Movements of the 1960’s.

She coped with divorces, financial instability, and professional job training, not to mention the “Gloria Films”. She suffered from the illness and loss of her young son, Skip. She faced with courage, her own untimely diagnosis of a terminal illness. She had many struggles but also maintained her exuberance about life and was infused with happiness from her children and close friends.

A flickering moment in 1964 brought her face to face with three renowned psychotherapists of modern times; namely, Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, and Albert Ellis. She overcame all of them. She found Rogers who, offering her less, provided more at a time when what she “needed most” was “to be me”. She grabbed the mantle, with puzzlement, from a man who primarily affirmed and confirmed her, steadfastly not taking anything away from her. She found someone to “back” her during her swirling biological thrust toward maintaining and enhancing her constructive growth process.

Gloria would surely have found something in the boring irrelevancies of the instructions from Albert Ellis, and from the bombastic observations of Fritz Perls to promote her growth. She remained positive, appreciative, and intent for growth even within her boredom and fury. She could have gained and stabilized herself in the “old” world through guidance, challenge and being pushed toward change. However, she found her own way in the interaction with Rogers. She reached out to find a life long contact, a ‘backup’ through her strength to ask Carl and Helen Rogers if they could consider themselves to be her ‘ghostly parents’. She would then follow her own direction including a mix of acquiring scientific knowledge of medicine to practicing meditation and examining spiritual teachings. Periodically, there were letters to and from both Carl and Helen Rogers but no longer personal meetings with either of them.

Gloria found freedom supported by ‘love’ to go in her own direction. Rogers was a touchstone that was a “backup”, a reminder of her inner power.

Gloria is the hero of the film. It is she who reminds us that it is the person and not the therapist. It is Gloria who reminds us that self-empowered individuals can make a difference in the world. She demonstrates that less is more, and that power lies within each individual as a connection to and influence on the world.

Any thoughts?

Jerold Bozarth

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#2 [url]

Sep 26 11 12:30 PM

Re: Carl Rogers & Gloria - Three Approaches To Psychotherapy

Chuck Stuart's (8 August 2011) response to Jerold is also worth a read:

[quote]
Dear Jerold,

I was but a few years older than Gloria, so I resonated deeply to your description of the world she grew up in. Just as Carl Rogers was a port in a storm for me when I discovered him in graduate school in 1963, so also was Gloria's powerful message to me. My own development brought me to valuing and accepting ideas, ways of thinking and being which were external to myself. Carl, and then Gloria open doors for me to challenge these externally introjected ways. I had been around professionals (including faculty) who scoffed at most of what came from within me, especially so after I met Gloria (in the film). "You're into Rogers? Surely you've moved beyond that!" was a typical response from many professional power seekers who didn't have an iota of understanding of who Carl was (to say nothing of their awareness of their own inner selves). Gloria's tentative, unsure, risky responses to Carl blew me away - for it was clear that it was a struggle to look inward, to value what she saw with Carl, and to put it out for him and her to consider. When she said, "I feel like I'd like to have you for a father," I was moved to tears, for it wasn't what Carl did per se, but it seemed to me that it was what he didn't do. Of course, what he didn't do was also based on respect, trust, total acceptance and a prizing that touched my heart. What a model for me!

Old reactions inside of me often reappear, emanating from the Victorian upbringing I was bathed in (although rebelled against), even to this day. I get challenged often by those who do not hear me; and I really do struggle to be heard, though rarely succeeding at ADPCA functions. But I took monumental lessons from both Gloria and Carl to the last half of my professional life and now into retirement. I will die having found and lived with deeply cherished values and ways of behaving which Carl, Gloria, and even you, Jerold helped me free.

So when you ask me about Gloria, my heart skips a beat something like the first time I fell in love. Thank you, dear Jerold, for putting forth your sense of Carl's, Helen's and Gloria's relationships to one another. I am happy to share my response to the world.

Chuck Stuart


As a footnote to the above, I think this gives an insight into the kind of exchange that most person-centred folk are missing out on by not being subscribed to the open secret that is the international listservs.

You can subscribe to Jerold Bozarth's list by just dropping him a line at jeroldbozarth@gmail.com

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#3 [url]

Sep 26 11 8:17 PM

Re: Carl Rogers & Gloria - Three Approaches To Psychotherapy

Wow!!! I've got goose bumps!!!! Thank you for sharing this

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#4 [url]

Sep 27 11 4:04 PM

Re: Carl Rogers & Gloria - Three Approaches To Psychotherapy

Chel 34’s response yesterday drew me to this thread. I am slowly reading my way around the board…I had not read this before. I guess the Gloria films touch us all in different ways. I was tremendously moved by the book but perhaps not in the ways already expressed in this thread. I hope you will all forgive such a long response….Indeed it got so long I didn’t feel I could post it here so I have posted it over on my Journal here:

http://kats-jouissance.insanejournal.com/

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#6 [url]

Mar 16 13 12:01 PM

Re: Carl Rogers & Gloria - Three Approaches To Psychotherapy

I think this post has been reported because of the broken links. We'll try to get them sorted.

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